Get my free 35+ page Healthy Weight & Blood Sugar Starter Kit

March 2, 2022

Can People With Diabetes Eat Fruit?

Table of Contents

Photo by Toni Cuenca on Pexels.com

Many authorities include fruit in the diet for diabetes and provide portion-size guides for fruit servings. The American Diabetes Assn recommends fruit as part of a healthy diet. Because some fruits contain more carbs than others, the serving sizes for fruit varies depending on the type of fruit. It is helpful to eat the skin of fruit when possible because it includes fiber which helps regulate glucose levels. Let’s investigate various fruits and how they fit into a diet for type 2 diabetes.

What are the best fruits for people with diabetes?

The best fruit choices are fresh, frozen or canned fruit with no added sugar.

  • Choose canned fruit in its own juice or an extra light syrup.
  • Be careful with fruit juice and dried fruit as the portion sizes are very small.

Below is a list of serving sizes based on a 15gm carb portion size and include fresh, frozen and canned fruit. Carefully measure your fruit servings to help control post meal glucose levels.

Apple (raw, 2 inches across) . . . . . . . . .1 apple

Applesauce (unsweetened) . . . . . . . . . .½ cup

Apricots (medium, raw) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 apricots

Apricots (canned) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .½ cup

Banana (small) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 banana

Blackberries (raw) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .¾ cup

Blueberries (raw) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .¾ cup

Cantaloupe (5 inches across) . . . . . . . . .⅓ melon (cubes) – 1 cup

Cherries (large, raw) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 cherries

Cherries (canned) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .½ cup

Figs (raw) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 ½ large or 2 medium

Fruit cocktail (canned) . . . . . . . . . . . . . .½ cup

Grapefruit (large) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .½ fruit

Grapefruit, segments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .¾ cup

Grapes (small) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 grapes

Honeydew (medium) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 slice (10 oz) (cubes) – 1 cup

Kiwi (large) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 fruit

Mandarin oranges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .¾ cup

Mango (small) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .½ mango or ½ cup

Nectarine (small) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 nectarine

Orange (small) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 orange

Peach (medium) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 peach ¾ cup

Peaches (canned) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .½ cup 2 halves

Pear . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .½ large

Pears (canned) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .½ cup 2 halves

Pineapple (raw) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .¾ cup

Pineapple (canned) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .½ cup

Plums (small) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 plums

Raspberries (raw) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 cup

Strawberries (raw, whole) . . . . . . . . . . . .1 ¼ cup

Tangerine (small) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 fruits

Watermelon, cubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 ¼ cup

Even though these portion size guides have the recommended amount of fruit to include in the diet, there are many people with diabetes who find they are unable to eat certain types of fruit. The best way to determine if you can safely eat fruit is to check your blood glucose levels after you eat your fruit serving.

Be sure to keep details about fruit serving size, glucose levels, etc. These details will allow you to evaluate which fruits and amounts are best for your own individual glucose levels. You may also find there are one or two fruits you cannot tolerate due to excessive post meal glucose levels.

As with most foods in your diet, each person must assess their individual tolerance. Therefore, one of the keys to excellent glucose management is testing glucose levels.

Christa is a media dietitian and nutrition consultant in the New York City area. She works with various brands and has been featured in dozens of outlets such as Women’s Health, EatingWell, and Peoples Magazine as a nutrition expert. Being a fact checker for EatingWell Magazine and a Medical Reviewer for Nourish, she brings her extensive experience within the field to provide compassionate, inclusive care using science for intimate and personalized messaging.

Christa brings warm laughter, joy, and medical expertise to any conversation allowing for honest science-based discussions with authenticity at their core.

In her private practice, she works with men and women suffering from emotional traumas that cause binge eating disorders exacerbating their type 2 diabetes, PCOS and insulin resistance.

Share Your Thoughts

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *